Can You Scratch My Leg?

After years of caregiving, I believe I know Lynn’s body and his emotional and physical needs as well or better than my own. Actually, I probably know it better because I don’t pay attention to my own.  By becoming that familiar with him, I’ve been able to take quick action to prevent minor problems from becoming major ones most of the time. However, by being so vigilante and adapt at making these assessments, it has resulted in a different problem—Lynn expects me to intuitively know what he needs!

For example, Lynn uses an air cushion seat.  The cushion is made up of multiple rows of air bladders that disperse air away from the weighted area (where he sits) to the outward bladders.  He then sits on a small layer of air which minimizes the pressure against his buttock.  The device is great because the firmness of the cushion can be adjusted as needed for comfort.  The bad news is that the material it is made from is like a bicycle tire and wears in time to produce tiny little holes which allow the air to leak out.  I then have to find the hole and patch it so he won’t be sitting on a flat cushion.  Periodically he will tell me to “check his cushion.” Unless there is truly a leak, it’s difficult for me to know from time to time if there is an actual difference in the inflated areas. He will say, “My butt hurts.”  I’ll respond, “Do you think the cushion needs adjusting?”  He responds, “Yes.”  I ask, “Do you think it needs more or less air?” His response, “I don’t know, just check it.” I then proceed to either add or remove air to make a change of some type.  It doesn’t help to ask if “that” fixed the problem because he can never tell. This can be rather frustrating as you can imagine because he wants me to fix a problem I can’t “feel” and to know if it’s “right” through my intuition.

If I look at this behavior as him being lazy and wanting me to take all responsibility for his comfort, then I get really annoyed, but if I remind myself that maybe the reason he can’t tell me if it’s right is because he has “butt de-sensitivity” then I’m a little more tolerant.  Maybe the reason he can’t tell me how it feels is because he’s been sitting on those nerve endings so long that he has lost sensitivity in that area. Think about it…if you sit in the same spot for an extended period of time and don’t move, can you even feel your skin touching the seat anymore? After a while it’s as if you and the seat are one and it’s difficult to know what is wrong if it’s gotten uncomfortable.  On the other hand, MS affects nerves; nerves transmit signals through the skin; could MS affect transmission of touch… sure, why not?

The other “touch” issue though is itching.  He no longer has the strength in his hands to scratch an itch.  He can slightly rub an itch but he can’t produce enough pressure to really dig in and scratch. He feels the itch, he calls for me to come scratch it and says something like, “My leg itches; scratch it.”  He seems to expect I’ll know which leg, where on the leg, how vigorous to scratch, and when I’ve stopped the itching. Now, in that situation, I think he just has come to expect that I’ll “know” what he needs.  I have to remind him that I can’t feel what he feels so he will need to stay “engaged” in the process.

 

Continue reaching at http://multiplesclerosis.net/living-with-ms/can-scratch-leg/

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About mscaregiverdonna

I am a full-time caregiver for my spouse who has Multiple Sclerosis while I try to work full-time, take care of our home, and handle any number of other functions that used to be shared by the two of us. I'm learning that it's amazing what you can do when you have to and when you have God to send you the resources you need to manage moment by moment.
This entry was posted in Emotional Effects, Physical effects and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

3 Responses to Can You Scratch My Leg?

  1. Reblogged this on OVERHEAD PATIENT LIFT and commented:
    Caregivers and their patients can become very close but no one can be expected to know what the other one wants without effective communication. Empathy and understanding can go a long way to ease problematic communications.

  2. rich walcott says:

    Please take me off your list

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